Difference between window.location.href=window.location.href and window.location.reload()

Difference between window.location.href=window.location.href and window.location.reload()

What is the difference between JavaScript’s
window.location.href = window.location.href

and
window.location.reload()

functions?

Solutions/Answers:

Solution 1:

If I remember correctly, window.location.reload() reloads the current page with POST data, while window.location.href=window.location.href does not include the POST data.

As noted by @W3Max in the comments below, window.location.href=window.location.href will not reload the page if there’s an anchor (#) in the URL – You must use window.location.reload() in this case.

Also, as noted by @Mic below, window.location.reload() takes an additional argument skipCache so that with using window.location.reload(true) the browser will skip the cache and reload the page from the server. window.location.reload(false) will do the opposite, and load the page from cache if possible.

Solution 2:

If you say window.location.reload(true) the browser will skip the cache and reload the page from the server. window.location.reload(false) will do the opposite.

Note: default value for window.location.reload() is false

Solution 3:

The difference is that

window.location = document.URL;

will not reload the page if there is a hash (#) in the URL (with or without something after it), whereas

window.location.reload();

will reload the page.

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Solution 4:

If you add the boolean true to the reload
window.location.reload(true) it will load from server.

It is not clear how supported this boolean is, W3Org mentions that NS used to support it

There MIGHT be a difference between the content of window.location.href and document.URL – there at least used to be a difference between location.href and the non-standard and deprecated document.location that had to do with redirection, but that is really last millennium.

For documentation purposes I would use window.location.reload() because that is what you want to do.

Solution 5:

As said, modifying the href when there is a hash (#) in the url would not reload the page. Thus, I use this to reload it instead of regular expressions:

if (!window.location.hash) {
    window.location.href = window.location.href;
} else {
    window.location.reload();
}

Solution 6:

Came across this question researching some aberrant behavior in IE, specifically IE9, didn’t check older versions. It seems

window.location.reload();

results in a refresh that blanks out the entire screen for a second, where as

 window.location = document.URL;

refreshes the page much more quickly, almost imperceptibly.

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Doing a bit more research, and some experimentation with fiddler, it seems that window.location.reload() will bypass the cache and reload from the server regardless if you pass the boolean with it or not, this includes getting all of your assets (images, scripts, style sheets, etc) again. So if you just want the page to refresh the HTML, the window.location = document.URL will return much quicker and with less traffic.

A difference in behavior between browsers is that when IE9 uses the reload method it clears the visible page and seemingly rebuilds it from scratch, where FF and chrome wait till they get the new assets and rebuild them if they are different.