How do you implement a Stack and a Queue in JavaScript?

How do you implement a Stack and a Queue in JavaScript?

What is the best way to implement a Stack and a Queue in JavaScript?
I’m looking to do the shunting-yard algorithm and I’m going to need these data-structures.

Solutions/Answers:

Solution 1:

var stack = [];
stack.push(2);       // stack is now [2]
stack.push(5);       // stack is now [2, 5]
var i = stack.pop(); // stack is now [2]
alert(i);            // displays 5

var queue = [];
queue.push(2);         // queue is now [2]
queue.push(5);         // queue is now [2, 5]
var i = queue.shift(); // queue is now [5]
alert(i);              // displays 2

taken from “9 javascript tips you may not know

Solution 2:

Javascript has push and pop methods, which operate on ordinary Javascript array objects.

For queues, look here:

http://safalra.com/web-design/javascript/queues/

Queues can be implemented in
JavaScript using either the push and
shift methods or unshift and pop
methods of the array object. Although
this is a simple way to implement
queues, it is very inefficient for
large queues — because the methods
operate on arrays, the shift and
unshift methods move every element in
the array each time they are called.

Queue.js is a simple and efficient queue implementation for JavaScript whose dequeue function runs in amortised constant time. As a result, for larger queues it can be significantly faster than using arrays.

Solution 3:

Arrays.

Stack:

var stack = [];

//put value on top of stack
stack.push(1);

//remove value from top of stack
var value = stack.pop();

Queue:

var queue = [];

//put value on end of queue
queue.push(1);

//Take first value from queue
var value = queue.shift();

Solution 4:

If you wanted to make your own data structures, you could build your own:

var Stack = function(){
  this.top = null;
  this.size = 0;
};

var Node = function(data){
  this.data = data;
  this.previous = null;
};

Stack.prototype.push = function(data) {
  var node = new Node(data);

  node.previous = this.top;
  this.top = node;
  this.size += 1;
  return this.top;
};

Stack.prototype.pop = function() {
  temp = this.top;
  this.top = this.top.previous;
  this.size -= 1;
  return temp;
};

And for queue:

var Queue = function() {
  this.first = null;
  this.size = 0;
};

var Node = function(data) {
  this.data = data;
  this.next = null;
};

Queue.prototype.enqueue = function(data) {
  var node = new Node(data);

  if (!this.first){
    this.first = node;
  } else {
    n = this.first;
    while (n.next) {
      n = n.next;
    }
    n.next = node;
  }

  this.size += 1;
  return node;
};

Queue.prototype.dequeue = function() {
  temp = this.first;
  this.first = this.first.next;
  this.size -= 1;
  return temp;
};

Solution 5:

My implementation of Stack and Queue using Linked List

// Linked List
function Node(data) {
  this.data = data;
  this.next = null;
}

// Stack implemented using LinkedList
function Stack() {
  this.top = null;
}

Stack.prototype.push = function(data) {
  var newNode = new Node(data);

  newNode.next = this.top; //Special attention
  this.top = newNode;
}

Stack.prototype.pop = function() {
  if (this.top !== null) {
    var topItem = this.top.data;
    this.top = this.top.next;
    return topItem;
  }
  return null;
}

Stack.prototype.print = function() {
  var curr = this.top;
  while (curr) {
    console.log(curr.data);
    curr = curr.next;
  }
}

// var stack = new Stack();
// stack.push(3);
// stack.push(5);
// stack.push(7);
// stack.print();

// Queue implemented using LinkedList
function Queue() {
  this.head = null;
  this.tail = null;
}

Queue.prototype.enqueue = function(data) {
  var newNode = new Node(data);

  if (this.head === null) {
    this.head = newNode;
    this.tail = newNode;
  } else {
    this.tail.next = newNode;
    this.tail = newNode;
  }
}

Queue.prototype.dequeue = function() {
  var newNode;
  if (this.head !== null) {
    newNode = this.head.data;
    this.head = this.head.next;
  }
  return newNode;
}

Queue.prototype.print = function() {
  var curr = this.head;
  while (curr) {
    console.log(curr.data);
    curr = curr.next;
  }
}

var queue = new Queue();
queue.enqueue(3);
queue.enqueue(5);
queue.enqueue(7);
queue.print();
queue.dequeue();
queue.dequeue();
queue.print();

Solution 6:

Javascript array shift() is slow especially when holding many elements. I know two ways to implement queue with amortized O(1) complexity.

First is by using circular buffer and table doubling. I have implemented this before. You can see my source code here
https://github.com/kevyuu/rapid-queue

The second way is by using two stack. This is the code for queue with two stack

function createDoubleStackQueue() {
var that = {};
var pushContainer = [];
var popContainer = [];

function moveElementToPopContainer() {
    while (pushContainer.length !==0 ) {
        var element = pushContainer.pop();
        popContainer.push(element);
    }
}

that.push = function(element) {
    pushContainer.push(element);
};

that.shift = function() {
    if (popContainer.length === 0) {
        moveElementToPopContainer();
    }
    if (popContainer.length === 0) {
        return null;
    } else {
        return popContainer.pop();
    }
};

that.front = function() {
    if (popContainer.length === 0) {
        moveElementToPopContainer();
    }
    if (popContainer.length === 0) {
        return null;
    }
    return popContainer[popContainer.length - 1];
};

that.length = function() {
    return pushContainer.length + popContainer.length;
};

that.isEmpty = function() {
    return (pushContainer.length + popContainer.length) === 0;
};

return that;}

This is performance comparison using jsPerf

CircularQueue.shift() vs Array.shift()

http://jsperf.com/rapidqueue-shift-vs-array-shift

As you can see it is significantly faster with large dataset