Is it possible to add dynamically named properties to JavaScript object?

Is it possible to add dynamically named properties to JavaScript object?

In JavaScript, I’ve created an object like so:
var data = {
‘PropertyA’: 1,
‘PropertyB’: 2,
‘PropertyC’: 3
};

Is it possible to add further properties to this object after it’s initial creation if the properties name is not determined until run time? i.e.
var propName = ‘Property’ + someUserInput
//imagine someUserInput was ‘Z’, how can I now add a ‘PropertyZ’ property to
//my object?

Solutions/Answers:

Solution 1:

Yes.

var data = {
    'PropertyA': 1,
    'PropertyB': 2,
    'PropertyC': 3
};

data["PropertyD"] = 4;

// dialog box with 4 in it
alert(data.PropertyD);
alert(data["PropertyD"]);

Solution 2:

ES6 for the win!

const b = 'b';
const c = 'c';

const data = {
    a: true,
    [b]: true, // dynamic property
    [`interpolated-${c}`]: true, // dynamic property + interpolation
    [`${b}-${c}`]: true
}

If you log data you get this:

{
  a: true,
  b: true,
  interpolated-c: true,
  b-c: true
}

This makes use of the new Computed Property syntax and Template Literals.

Solution 3:

Yes it is possible. Assuming:

var data = {
    'PropertyA': 1,
    'PropertyB': 2,
    'PropertyC': 3
};
var propertyName = "someProperty";
var propertyValue = "someValue";

Either:

data[propertyName] = propertyValue;

or

eval("data." + propertyName + " = '" + propertyValue + "'");

The first method is preferred. eval() has the obvious security concerns if you’re using values supplied by the user so don’t use it if you can avoid it but it’s worth knowing it exists and what it can do.

You can reference this with:

alert(data.someProperty);

or

data(data["someProperty"]);

or

alert(data[propertyName]);

Solution 4:

I know that the question is answered perfectly, but I also found another way to add new properties and wanted to share it with you:

You can use the function Object.defineProperty()

Found on Mozilla Developer Network

Example:

var o = {}; // Creates a new object

// Example of an object property added with defineProperty with a data property descriptor
Object.defineProperty(o, "a", {value : 37,
                               writable : true,
                               enumerable : true,
                               configurable : true});
// 'a' property exists in the o object and its value is 37

// Example of an object property added with defineProperty with an accessor property descriptor
var bValue;
Object.defineProperty(o, "b", {get : function(){ return bValue; },
                               set : function(newValue){ bValue = newValue; },
                               enumerable : true,
                               configurable : true});
o.b = 38;
// 'b' property exists in the o object and its value is 38
// The value of o.b is now always identical to bValue, unless o.b is redefined

// You cannot try to mix both :
Object.defineProperty(o, "conflict", { value: 0x9f91102, 
                                       get: function() { return 0xdeadbeef; } });
// throws a TypeError: value appears only in data descriptors, get appears only in accessor descriptors

Solution 5:

Here, using your notation:

var data = {
    'PropertyA': 1,
    'PropertyB': 2,
    'PropertyC': 3
};
var propName = 'Property' + someUserInput
//imagine someUserInput was 'Z', how can I now add a 'PropertyZ' property to 
//my object?
data[propName] = 'Some New Property value'

Solution 6:

in addition to all the previous answers, and in case you’re wondering how we’re going to write dynamic property names in the Future using Computed Property Names ( ECMAScript 6 ), here’s how:

var person = "John Doe";
var personId = "person_" + new Date().getTime();
var personIndex = {
    [ personId ]: person
//  ^ computed property name
};

personIndex[ personId ]; // "John Doe"

reference: Understanding ECMAScript 6 – Nickolas Zakas