Reverse of JSON.stringify?

Reverse of JSON.stringify?

I’m stringyfing an object like {‘foo’: ‘bar’}
How can I turn the string back to an object?

Solutions/Answers:

Solution 1:

You need to JSON.parse() the string.

var str = '{"hello":"world"}';
try {
  var obj = JSON.parse(str); // this is how you parse a string into JSON 
  document.body.innerHTML += obj.hello;
} catch (ex) {
  console.error(ex);
}

Solution 2:

JSON.parse is the opposite of JSON.stringify.

Solution 3:

JSON.stringify and JSON.parse are almost oposites, and “usually” this kind of thing will work:

var obj = ...;
var json = JSON.stringify(obj);  
var obj2 = JSON.parse(json);

so that obj and obj2 are “the same”.

However there are some limitations to be aware of.
Often these issues dont matter as you’re dealing with simple objects.
But I’ll illustrate some of them here, using this helper function:

function jsonrepack( obj ) { return JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj) ); }
  • You’ll only get ownProperties of the object and lose prototypes:

    var MyClass = function() { this.foo="foo"; } 
    MyClass.prototype = { bar:"bar" }
    
    var o = new MyClass();
    var oo = jsonrepack(o);
    console.log(oo.bar); // undefined
    console.log( oo instanceof MyClass ); // false
    
  • You’ll lose identity:

    var o = {};
    var oo = jsonrepack(o);
    console.log( o === oo ); // false
    
  • Functions dont survive:

    jsonrepack( { f:function(){} } ); // Returns {}
    
  • Date objects end up as strings:

    jsonrepack(new Date(1990,2,1)); // Returns '1990-02-01T16:00:00.000Z'
    
  • Undefined values dont survive:

    var v = { x:undefined }
    console.log("x" in v);              // true
    console.log("x" in jsonrepack(v));  // false
    
  • Objects that provide a toJSON function may not behave correctly.

    x = { f:"foo", toJSON:function(){ return "EGAD"; } }
    jsonrepack(x) // Returns 'EGAD'
    

I’m sure there are issues with other built-in-types too. (All this was tested using node.js so you may get slightly different behaviour depending on your environment too).

When it does matter it can sometimes be overcome using the additional parameters of JSON.parse and JSON.stringify. For example:

function MyClass (v) {
   this.date = new Date(v.year,1,1);
   this.name = "an object";
};

MyClass.prototype.dance = function() {console.log("I'm dancing"); }

var o = new MyClass({year:2010});
var s = JSON.stringify(o);

// Smart unpack function
var o2 = JSON.parse( s, function(k,v){
  if(k==="") { 
     var rv = new MyClass(1990,0,0);
     rv.date = v.date;
     rv.name = v.name;
     return rv
  } else if(k==="date") {
    return new Date( Date.parse(v) );
  } else { return v; } } );

console.log(o);             // { date: <Mon Feb 01 2010 ...>, name: 'an object' }
console.log(o.constructor); // [Function: MyClass]
o.dance();                  // I'm dancing

console.log(o2);            // { date: <Mon Feb 01 2010 ...>, name: 'an object' }
console.log(o2.constructor) // [Function: MyClass]        
o2.dance();                 // I'm dancing

Solution 4:

Recommended is to use JSON.parse

There is an alternative you can do :

 var myObject = eval('(' + myJSONtext + ')');

Json in javascript

Why is using the JavaScript eval function a bad idea?

Solution 5:

http://jsbin.com/tidob/1/edit?js,console,output

The native JSON object includes two key methods.

1. JSON.parse()
2. JSON.stringify() 
  1. The JSON.parse() method parses a JSON string – i.e. reconstructing the original JavaScript object

    var jsObject = JSON.parse(jsonString);

  2. JSON.stringify() method accepts a JavaScript object and returns its JSON equivalent.

    var jsonString = JSON.stringify(jsObject);

Solution 6:

How about this

var parsed = new Function('return ' + stringifiedJSON )();

This is a safer alternative for eval.

var stringifiedJSON = '{"hello":"world"}';
var parsed = new Function('return ' + stringifiedJSON)();
alert(parsed.hello);