Wait until all jQuery Ajax requests are done?

Wait until all jQuery Ajax requests are done?

How do I make a function wait until all jQuery Ajax requests are done inside another function?
In short, I need to wait for all Ajax requests to be done before I execute the next. But how?

Solutions/Answers:

Solution 1:

jQuery now defines a when function for this purpose.

It accepts any number of Deferred objects as arguments, and executes a function when all of them resolve.

That means, if you want to initiate (for example) four ajax requests, then perform an action when they are done, you could do something like this:

$.when(ajax1(), ajax2(), ajax3(), ajax4()).done(function(a1, a2, a3, a4){
    // the code here will be executed when all four ajax requests resolve.
    // a1, a2, a3 and a4 are lists of length 3 containing the response text,
    // status, and jqXHR object for each of the four ajax calls respectively.
});

function ajax1() {
    // NOTE:  This function must return the value 
    //        from calling the $.ajax() method.
    return $.ajax({
        url: "someUrl",
        dataType: "json",
        data:  yourJsonData,            
        ...
    });
}

In my opinion, it makes for a clean and clear syntax, and avoids involving any global variables such as ajaxStart and ajaxStop, which could have unwanted side effects as your page develops.

If you don’t know in advance how many ajax arguments you need to wait for (i.e. you want to use a variable number of arguments), it can still be done but is just a little bit trickier. See Pass in an array of Deferreds to $.when() (and maybe jQuery .when troubleshooting with variable number of arguments).

If you need deeper control over the failure modes of the ajax scripts etc., you can save the object returned by .when() – it’s a jQuery Promise object encompassing all of the original ajax queries. You can call .then() or .fail() on it to add detailed success/failure handlers.

Solution 2:

If you want to wait until all ajax requests are finished in your document, no matter how many of them exist, just use $.ajaxStop event this way:

  $(document).ajaxStop(function () {
      // 0 === $.active
  });

In this case, there is no need to guess how many requests can be in an application that might finish in the future. In some cases ajax requests can be part of a function’s inner logic, which can be quite complicated (e.g. calling other functions), and in that case, you might not wait until said function is done with its entire logic rather than only waiting for the ajax part to complete.

$.ajaxStop here can also be bound to any HTML node that you think might be modified by ajax.

Again the purpose of this handler is to know when there is no active ajax not to clear or reset something.

P.S. If you don’t mind using ES6 syntax, then you can use Promise.all for known ajax methods. Example:

Promise.all([ajax1(), ajax2()]).then(() => {
 // all requests finished successfully
}).catch(() => {
 // all requests finished but one or more failed
})

An interesting point here is that it works both with Promises and $.ajax requests. Here is jsFiddle demonstrating the last one.

Solution 3:

I found a good answer by gnarf my self which is exactly what I was looking for 🙂

jQuery ajaxQueue

//This handles the queues    
(function($) {

  var ajaxQueue = $({});

  $.ajaxQueue = function(ajaxOpts) {

    var oldComplete = ajaxOpts.complete;

    ajaxQueue.queue(function(next) {

      ajaxOpts.complete = function() {
        if (oldComplete) oldComplete.apply(this, arguments);

        next();
      };

      $.ajax(ajaxOpts);
    });
  };

})(jQuery);

Then you can add a ajax request to the queue like this:

$.ajaxQueue({
        url: 'page.php',
        data: {id: 1},
        type: 'POST',
        success: function(data) {
            $('#status').html(data);
        }
    });

Solution 4:

Use the ajaxStop event.

For example, let’s say you have a loading … message while fetching 100 ajax requests and you want to hide that message once loaded.

From the jQuery doc:

$("#loading").ajaxStop(function() {
  $(this).hide();
});

Do note that it will wait for all ajax requests being done on that page.

Solution 5:

NOTE: The above answers use functionality that didn’t exist at the time that this answer was written. I recommend using jQuery.when() instead of these approaches, but I’m leaving the answer for historical purposes.

You could probably get by with a simple counting semaphore, although how you implement it would be dependent on your code. A simple example would be something like…

var semaphore  = 0,     // counting semaphore for ajax requests
    all_queued = false; // bool indicator to account for instances where the first request might finish before the second even starts

semaphore++;
$.get('ajax/test1.html', function(data) {
    semaphore--;
    if (all_queued && semaphore === 0) {
        // process your custom stuff here
    }
});

semaphore++;
$.get('ajax/test2.html', function(data) {
    semaphore--;
    if (all_queued && semaphore === 0) {
        // process your custom stuff here
    }
});

semaphore++;
$.get('ajax/test3.html', function(data) {
    semaphore--;
    if (all_queued && semaphore === 0) {
        // process your custom stuff here
    }
});

semaphore++;
$.get('ajax/test4.html', function(data) {
    semaphore--;
    if (all_queued && semaphore === 0) {
        // process your custom stuff here
    }
});

// now that all ajax requests are queued up, switch the bool to indicate it
all_queued = true;

If you wanted this to operate like {async: false} but you didn’t want to lock the browser, you could accomplish the same thing with a jQuery queue.

var $queue = $("<div/>");
$queue.queue(function(){
    $.get('ajax/test1.html', function(data) {
        $queue.dequeue();
    });
}).queue(function(){
    $.get('ajax/test2.html', function(data) {
        $queue.dequeue();
    });
}).queue(function(){
    $.get('ajax/test3.html', function(data) {
        $queue.dequeue();
    });
}).queue(function(){
    $.get('ajax/test4.html', function(data) {
        $queue.dequeue();
    });
});

Solution 6:

javascript is event-based, so you should never wait, rather set hooks/callbacks

You can probably just use the success/complete methods of jquery.ajax

Or you could use .ajaxComplete :

$('.log').ajaxComplete(function(e, xhr, settings) {
  if (settings.url == 'ajax/test.html') {
    $(this).text('Triggered ajaxComplete handler.');
    //and you can do whatever other processing here, including calling another function...
  }
});

though youy should post a pseudocode of how your(s) ajax request(s) is(are) called to be more precise…